Firearm related

M92 PAP Sight fix

 

So it has been several years since my last post but, I decided to share my solution to fixing my sights on my Zastava Arms M92 PAP imported by Century Arms. I have had my fair share of problems with guns that had Century Arms quilatity control issues.I find that their firearms appeal to the casual user due to the price point and with import laws shrinking the number of importable AK type weapons the choices are becoming limited. So I was in the market for a Yugoslavian M92 several years ago and found that they were hard to come by or the price was beyond my reach. Enter the M92 PAP a pistol version of the Yugo M92 SBR (short barreled rifle), this was very similar with the exception of being imported as a pistol. I purchased one in the $500.00 price range , and proceeded to  stain the wood hand guards in addition to a few other minor modifications.After test firing it a few times and found that it would hit paper at 25 yards, I took the weapon home for a cleaning and away it went into the safe. Fast forward until this week when it came out again and I decided that I wanted to get the gun zeroed and start using it , after several magazines full of ammo I was hitting steel at 150 yards with iron sights as long as I did my part but there lies the problem. The gun did infact have a flaw that would become apparent , I had found that the front sights was canted as well as the rear sight block. Once again Century Arms strikes again! Or Zastava where the pistol was produced. I should have preformed a better inspection when purchasing the firearm, live and learn. So I decided to straighten the sights and I will post the steps that I took to solved this issue.

 

Step 1: Strip the gun down of all unnecessary components (its makes it easier to work with and prevents damage)

 

Step 2: Using some oil place a drop on the roll pins to be removed from the front and rear sight blocks.

 

Step 3: Using a starter punch and hammer over a bench block, drive the roll pins out, switch to a longer punch after it starts to move.

Step 4: I placed some oil on the barrel and sights blocks to hope that oil would seep into these areas to help break it free

Step 5: With the pins removed measure the distance of space on both side of the rear sight block and front trunnion with a feeler gauge.

 

 

Step 6: After the space is determined place the action into a secure vice( I used soft jaws to prevent damaged to the receiver).Soft Jaws

 

KEY TIP :  The key is to clamp the weapon as close as possible to the item you want to move, thus limiting the amount of rotational force exerted on the barrel and reciever in this case.

Step 7 :  Using a large adjustable wrench I turned in the direction I wanted the block to go (placing the jaws on the flat spots of the rear sight block . ( !! This will take some force be sure to take your time and go slowly !! )

Step 8: Preform the same task on the front sight block ( I position my wrench on the bottom as I was cautious not to bent the ears on the front sight block. )

 

Step 9: Check the both the front and rear sights front straightness .

QUICK TIP flip the AKM pattern weapon over  and place on a flat surface. It should balance on the front and rear sights and wobble or gap with show during this step. If no light is shown your good to go on.

Step 10: Drill the roll pin holes one size larger and cut new pins for the holes and install back in the respective hole. I find that drill rod works great to make new pins. Just make sure to heat treat the pins prior to installation.

Done ! Enjoy your accomplishment you just fixed your canted sights.

I hope that this helps someone who faces this dilemma.

~ Chris

 

 

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DIY AKM Trigger Job

Disclaimer: I do not warrant or represent the reliability or accuracy of any of the content and/or information. You are using the information/content provided “to be used at your own risk”.

While the following information could be used to enhance the feel or improvement of any AKM style trigger group, I will be using a single-hook Tapco G2 trigger. Tapco G2 triggers can be had for under $30 and will work right out of the  box , that doesn’t mean there is no room for improvement , because there is but you must be careful not to go to far in removing material . Now Im not going to get into changing the angles of the disconnector or trigger but will illustrate how to re-profile  the hammer. A common problem that many are plauged with can be the bolt carrier sticking to the rear when the weapon is charged ,when the hammer is re-profiled it can aid in this problem but there are many other factors that influence this problem. To get started open up your Tapco trigger box and inside you will find 4 pieces :hammer , discconecter, trigger and a “No Fumble” Trigger Sleeve. The sleeve allows the entire trigger/disconnector assembly to be dropped right into place( which makes for a much easier install).

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Take the hammer from the box and place it a vice, then we are going to take a file and take the sharp angles out and what we want is a smooth radius. This will aid in cycling of the weapon.

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Slowly run your file across the hammer knocking down the edges circled in the photo above take your time, if you rush you will end up throwing the hammer away because you took too much off and now your bolt doesn’t make contact with hammer. After getting the rough  shape take a dremil tool with an 80-grit cartridge and smooth out the rough edge that were caused but the file , you could problem stop at this point but I choose to work my way up in sand paper finishing with 1000 grit wet/dry paper. I wanted to remove all of the marks left by the file and previous sand paper grits.From start to finish I spent about 80-90 minutes going over all of the components ensuring there were no rough spots.

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While it is hard to tell in this photo the radius is completely smooth with only the casting mark seen near the bottom of the hammer, you could remove this mark but I didn’t seen it nessarary since this portion doesn’t make contact in the weapon with any other compent.Just by preforming this one step , you will noticed the weapon can be charged much easier because the bolt is not encountering a sharp angel but rather a smooth radius now.

IMG_0158 Also you can polish the area on the  trigger where the hammer spring rides, eliminating friction help aid in a smooth trigger pull. In addition you can also polish the axis pin that hold the trigger group and the hammer , though not required it does seem to help the overall feel of a trigger job/polish.  I hope you found this insightful.

Cheers,

Chris

 

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DIY Kryptek Camouflage

So I decided to paint one of my AR15’s , but I have been really hesitant to do so. What if I didn’t like it or what if I screwed up the paint job due to an error, well enough with the what if’s. I cleaned and prepped the gun for paint, using an adhesion promoter to give the paint something to stick too. Originally I was going to go with Multi-cam but decided that I like the Kryptek pattern better, after laying down a base coat of Khaki then wait for 24 hrs to ensure that the paint would not lift when the vinyl graphic was applied. After a time consuming 2 hours I sprayed the rifle with  Nutmeg , Brown and Olive Green from Rustolem’s line of flat camouflage paints. With some random gradients I managed to pull of a pretty decent paint job. It actually turned out better than I originally thought. Any question feel free to send me an email.

Cheers,

Chris

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photo 1

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Rust into FePO4 ( Part 2 Magazine refinishing )

Well this will be Part 2 of the Yugoslavian Magazine refinishing, in part 1 we removed Cosmoline with basic supplies.Now that that magazines are grease/solvent free we will proceed to remove the rust spots that are found on long-term storage items. Cosmoline does a good job of being a ” rust preventive” but even so the elements take their toll on metal parts. So here we go

Step 1: Place the magazines and floor plates and/or followers back into the baking tin and pour any cola product (the active ingredient being phosphoric acid) into the tin until the parts are completely submerged.

Magazines in Cola

Magazines in Cola

Step 2: This is where you wait, depending on the amount of rust of the amount of stripping you want to preform on the metal parts. I left the magazines and floor plates in the cola for about 12 hours, the next day this is what I found

12 hours later

12 hours later

After looking at the results and looking back at this process I would recommend flipping the parts over to allow even penetration on both sides of the part as shown in the example below

Left side was face down in pan, right side was face up in the pan

Left side was face down in pan, right side was face up in the pan

Step 3: Once again I cleaned the parts with hot soapy water and a scotch bright pad to rough up the metal a bit.

Cleaned and ready for a light sanding

Cleaned and ready for a light sanding

Step 4: After I sanded the parts with 800 grit wet/dry sand paper I wiped all of the parts down with acetone to remove any trace of residue or grease. I wore gloves during the process so I would not contaminate the surface to be painted. Follow the instructions for what ever product you are using, these magazines will be coated with Brownell’s Alumahyde II , it seems to offer good results as long as your let the item significant time to cure.

Step 5: optional

After letting the magazines cure for 7 days , I proceed to rub them down with a light oil to bring out the sheen a bit as shown below.

oil/ no oil

oil/ no oil

that’s all there is to it, if you have a bit of time you can breath some life into your magazines.

Thanks,

Chris

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Restoring Yugoslavian AK Magazines

Ak style magazines that in poor condition from long term storage, can be giving a new life with some easy to follow tips.

Here are a few magazines that I mail ordered, as seen they are covered in Cosmoline. For those of you that have never encounter this wax-like grease, you may find it rather difficult to remove. Cosmoline has seen been replaced by Vacuum packed  PET film.(1)

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After extensive reading of gun forums and Youtube videos, I found that mineral spirits makes quick work of dissoving the Cosmoline from metal parts. So I picked up a cheap roasting tin from a local dollar store and a gallon of mineral spirits from the home improvement store.

I would recommend doing this in a well ventilated area , to avoid inhailing the chemicals used during the process and to always wear eye protection.

Step 1: Place the Magazines or other parts to be cleaned into the pan and fill the pan with mineral spirits until the parts are covered completely.

Step 2: Let the parts sit in the solution for 10-20 minutes longer if needed, using and old parts cleaning brush with some old rags during the process to help remove some of the Cosmoline.

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After the solution has done its job I wiped the parts down with blue shop towels since, the Cosmoline is impossible to remove from cloth. Make sure to dispose of the rags and used cleaning solution properly. I saved the Mineral Spirits in a large Ball Jar for later use.

 

Step 3: (optional) I washed all of the parts in hot soapy water to remove any loose bit of cosmoline, promptly dry the parts otherwise they may begin to rust rather quickly , which is ok if you plan to repaint them. Repainting/Refining will be found in Part 2 of Magazine restoration. Stay Tuned for Part 2

 

References:
(1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmoline

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